Paul’s Faith Proclaims Christ is Risen

          “We ourselves are proclaiming this good news to you that what God promised our ancestors He has brought to fulfillment for us, [their] children, by raising up Jesus.” (Acts 13:32-33a) Saint Paul the Apostle preached these powerful words as he addressed his fellow Israelites and others in the Synagogue at Antioch. His speech was passionate, his faith was robust, and his surrender was inspiring. Jesus Christ is risen and his conviction in Christ’s resurrection was unshakable.

            Saint Paul’s encounter with the Risen Christ on his way to Damascus formed an integral part of his conviction in Jesus’ resurrection. Prior to this conversion experience, he, Saul of Tarsus, was a fierce persecutor of anyone who was a disciple of the Lord. He traveled with the intention of hunting down as many followers of the Way as possible at Damascus and bringing them back to Jerusalem as prisoners.

            However, the Risen Lord manifested Himself to Saul in a flash of light from the sky as he was arriving at Damascus and questioned his persecuting spirit. The suddenly blind Saul rose from the ground and ultimately arrived at the house of a man named Judas. For at least three days, he prayed to the Risen Lord, who revealed that Ananias the disciple would pray for him to regain his sight. When Ananias finally arrived, Paul encountered the power of God, regained his sight, was baptized, and was filled with the Spirit of the Risen Lord.

Continue reading “They’ll Know Christ is Risen Through our Christian Experience”

Holy Week

On Palm Sunday, the Catholic Church celebrates the day in which Christ, in order to generously fulfill the Will of God, solemnly entered Jerusalem where He would die for our salvation. With palms, we glorify and praise the King of Kings, who has come into this world in the form of a slave (1st reading: Flp 2, 6-11) to offer to humanity the greatest service possible: “give His life as a ransom for many.” (Mt 20:28)

Indeed, we must meditate more intensely on the great mystery of the passion and death of our Lord Jesus Christ, who, having full authority, chose to suffer everything for love of us and for our salvation. Therefore, it will be beneficial to do the following five things in the coming days:

 

1)On Holy Monday: consider whether or not our lives honor Jesus Christ, and ask Him for the grace to be able to live more for Him.

2)On Holy Tuesday: meditate on the times in which we, like Peter, have denied Christ, and how we need Him to give us the strength to be His true witnesses.

3)On Holy Wednesday: meditate on the times in which we, like Judas, have betrayed Jesus, and say to Him throughout the day, “Jesus, Son of God and Son of Mary, have pity on me.”

4)On Holy Thursday: spend at least an hour after Mass with Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament, who asks us, as He asked His disciples, “Could you not keep watch with Me for one hour? Watch and pray that you may not undergo the test.”

5)And on Holy Friday: participate, with great fervor and contrition, in the Via Crucis.

 

These five resolutions will help us have a Holy Week.  The following parable/story sums up well the significance of what we celebrate during Holy Week:

Continue reading “5 Ways to Have A Life Changing Holy Week”

The Season of Lent

The Season of Lent is a forty-day period that occurs annually beginning with Ash Wednesday and ending on Holy Saturday. There are actually forty-six days in total between these two days. However, the six Sundays of Lent are not part of the forty-day count since Sundays are not days of fasting and acts of penance—except the required Eucharistic fast. This great season is an invitation to follow Jesus of Nazareth into the desert to pray, to do penance, and to discover, accept and accomplish the will of God. Though we are encouraged to practice prayer, sacrifice, and almsgiving on a daily basis, we are ardently encouraged to do so during the Lenten season.

 

What to Give Up For Lent

Prayer, sacrifice, and almsgiving are crucial if we desire to know, love, and follow Christ better. Ultimately, these three spiritual works are indispensable to live as children of God. Therefore, we should pray and sacrifice well, and we must contemplate cautiously the sacrifices we decide to offer during the Lenten season—they should challenge us to grow.  Sometimes we may elect to surrender something that we enjoy eating or drinking for the sake of renouncing something during Lent, but this can be too effortless. Some abstain from sweet chocolate, soda, alcohol, fatty foods, or other sweets during Lent. But we must ask ourselves whether these sacrifices truly help us draw closer to Christ. This is an important question especially if we return to these things when the Lenten period is over.

 

These dietary sacrifices can certainly be physically helpful over time and can strengthen our bodies which are temples of the Holy Spirit. However, many people quickly return to them when the Alleluias reappear and consume them without moderation. On the other hand, refraining from something because it will permit us to fulfill God’s will more thoroughly is not as easy. When we shun anger and selfishness, hatred and resentments, as well as pride and lust, we sacrifice those things that can truly distance us from God. Taking all this into consideration, we may need to ask ourselves, “During this Lenten season, is there something in particular that I need to give up for Lent? Or might there be something that I should be taking up?”

Continue reading “What to Give Up for Lent”

 

            Challenging life experiences and intimidating circumstances constantly remind us that we need to continuously rebuild our confidence in God. As I reflected on Scripture and our world this week, this word – confidence – emphatically stands out. It is a word that not only the disciples struggled with, but also the people of Israel and Judah.

 

            Long ago in the ancient world, a powerful empire emerged in the north of Mesopotamia. Assyria was a mighty force, feared by numerous regions, and was an intimidating presence to Israel and Judah. This empire took pride in their dominion and arrogantly strove to displace God as the supreme ruler of the world. For their outright rejection of the Lord and their usurping ambitions, God eventually punished them. Isaiah the prophet proclaimed:

“The LORD of hosts has sworn: As I have resolved, so shall it be; As I have planned, so shall it stand: To break the Assyrian in my land and trample him on my mountains; Then his yoke shall be removed from them, and his burden from their shoulder. This is the plan proposed for the whole earth, and this the hand outstretched over all the nations. The LORD of hosts has planned; who can thwart him? His hand is stretched out; who can turn it back?” (Is 14:24-27)

Continue reading “The Difference it Makes When Our Confidence is in God”

sacred heart of jesus novena prayers

When Christians pray for nine days for a special occasion or intention they are participating in novena prayers. The first novena ever prayed occurred immediately after Jesus ascended to heaven. The Sacred Scriptures tell us, “When they entered the city [of Jerusalem] they went to the upper room where they were staying, Peter and John and James and Andrew, Philip and Thomas, Bartholomew and Matthew, James son of Alphaeus, Simon the Zealot, and Judas son of James. All these devoted themselves with one accord to prayer, together with some women, and Mary the mother of Jesus, and his brothers.” (Acts 1:13-14) 

The Apostles and other disciples gathered in the upper room together with Mother Mary and prayed for the descent of the Holy Spirit as Jesus had promised. For nine days, they prayerfully gathered until the feast of Pentecost. Certainly, this must have been a powerful nine-day experience as many present-day novenas are. Novena prayers also offer us some extra good news. In addition to obtaining a particular favor by praying a novena, there are five benefits of doing novena prayers that we gain and that I would like to share with you.

Continue reading “5 Surprising Benefits of Doing Novena Prayers”

I’m certain most people reading this will recognize the name Samuel, particularly since we hear about him at Mass these days. It is in the Old Testament that we read about a woman – his mother – named Hannah, who was barren for many years until God eventually blessed her with a son. In gratitude to the Lord, she dedicates her boy, Samuel, to serve at the shrine of Shiloh under Eli the priest. One night, the young Samuel heard his name being called at a late hour. However, when the young one approached Eli three times, the latter responded the first and second time, “I did not call you, go back to sleep.” Then, the third time, he perceived clearly what was happening and instructed the young Samuel, “Go to sleep, and if you are called, reply, ‘Speak, LORD, for your servant is listening.’” (1 Sam 3:1-10)

Why would God call Samuel?

Certainly, many have wondered why God would elect to call someone like him at such a young age. This naturally leads to the question: “Who does God call?” I reflected upon this when I read the book Awakening Vocation, by Edward P. Hahnenberg. It examines the history of how vocation has been understood and challenges its readers to rethink vocation in light of a revitalized theology of grace. Indeed, God yearns to communicate Himself to all people. Therefore, He also invites all people to know, love, and serve Him.

As we saw with Samuel, a vocation is formed when God calls.

Indeed, His call is ultimately one that has as the primary goal the salvation and sanctification of souls. Nevertheless, when we consider the term vocation, we are reminded – as Hahnenberg stated in his book – that, “for centuries, Catholicism restricted the category of vocation to the priesthood and religious life.” Lay people were “those who were not clergy, those ‘who were not consecrated for the service of God.’” (Hahnenberg, 7) Holiness and evangelical action were seen as belonging only to the monks, to those consecrated to the religious life, and to the clergy. The lay faithful were viewed as people who lived in the world and only involved in worldly affairs, and they were viewed quite negatively. However, Vatican II emphasized that all Christians in every state of life are called to holiness, and now “three vocations stand out in postconciliar Catholic teaching as the paradigmatic way of living out the universal call to holiness: ordained ministry, consecrated life, and the lay life.” (41)

Continue reading “Vocation of the Laity”

When momentous incidents unfold and present us with various alternatives, we must choose wisely. This became apparent when Magi from the east arrived in Jerusalem before Herod the Great. King Herod had been appointed “King of the Jews” – that is, ruler of Judea – approximately thirty-six years prior to their visit. Upon hearing the Magi’s inquiry, “Where is the newborn king of the Jews? We saw his star at its rising and have come to do him homage,” the Matthean Gospel tells us that all of Jerusalem, as well as this King from an Edomite family, were greatly troubled. To put it differently, Herod the King felt threatened and, therefore, desired to end the threat.

Continue reading “The Adoration of the Magi – Lessons Learned”

A Transformative Greeting

Greetings on this blessed day! Whether it be the initial day of the year or any other day, we overflow with joy when we are greeted with well wishes and blessings. Certainly, heartfelt salutations from new and childhood acquaintances, friends and loved ones, and from brothers and sisters in the Faith are cherished and relished greatly. In addition, certain greetings can be transformative. An encounter comes to mind that transpired a little over 2,000 years ago. The Gospel of Luke recounts the following, “When Elizabeth heard Mary’s greeting, the infant leaped in her womb, and Elizabeth, filled with the holy Spirit, cried out in a loud voice and said, ‘Most blessed are you among women, and blessed is the fruit of your womb. And how does this happen to me, that the mother of my Lord should come to me? For at the moment the sound of your greeting reached my ears, the infant in my womb leaped for joy. Blessed are you who believed that what was spoken to you by the Lord would be fulfilled.’” (Luke 1:41-45)

 

What a blessed and divine moment! Mary’s transformative greeting anointed Elizabeth with the Spirit of Light and Joy. So potent was this encounter that Elizabeth recognized her cousin Mary as the mother of her Lord. She blessed Mary, who, in turn, could have blessed Elizabeth, saying, “Blessed are you, [Elizabeth]. For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but [our] heavenly Father.” (Mt 16:17) Indeed, it was by the Holy Spirit’s grace, sent by the Father and the Son, that Elizabeth grasped in her being that Mary was the mother of her Lord and, similarly, comprehended that Mary believed that what was spoken to her by that same Lord would be fulfilled.

Continue reading “How Mary is Mother of God”

The Human Family In Crisis

The institution of the human family appears to be in crisis. Today, countless families are experiencing discord and tremendous friction, and their members are living in residences that have turned into temples of selfishness, hatred, resentment, envy, and indifference. Family members are craving for greater peace in their homes. Furthermore, numerous children are yearning to be better comprehended by their parents and these, in turn, are not feeling truly respected and honored by their children. Also, numerous husbands and wives are praying to be loved and valued again by their spouse. Indeed, everyone wants to feel appreciated and happy.

Continue reading “Keys to Becoming a Blessed and Prosperous Family”

The first of January seemingly possesses the power to motivate us to dream again, formulate new goals, and take up new tasks. Our journey during the previous three hundred and sixty-five days probably had its share of pleasant, successful, dismal, and disappointing moments. Therefore, many receive the beginning of a new year with great hope and optimism as it represents a fresh start from a challenging one. Surely, we eagerly await beginning anew and living a prosperous year.

New Year’s Resolutions

New Year’s resolutions express our resolve and determination to complete actions that will improve our lives. These are decisions based on either past experiences, personal development, or wants and desires. Yet, we often struggle with carrying them through until the end of the year. We wonder whether it is because our commitment fades over time, our perseverance and strength deplete, or our new resolutions are too ambitious. However, we could be overlooking other crucial factors that are hidden in a parable shared by Jesus of Nazareth.  

Continue reading “Following Through On Life-Changing Resolutions”